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Entries in Montessori sensorial project (11)

Sunday
Jan132013

Matching Bracelets

Here's a creative idea for the Sensorial area of the Montessori environment.

...In the classroom or home! 

Photographed (TJS) at the PNMA Spring Sharing Fair, Bellevue Montessori School, WA. 

Thursday
Mar152012

Shamrock Sensorial Activity

Virginia Hood, UMA student, on staff at Christian Montessori Academy in Las Vegas, Nevada

Shares her hand-made Shamrock Activity. Perfect for a St. Patrick's Day theme!

(5 shamrocks, large to small) 

Thanks, Ginny!

Friday
Nov042011

Nature's Beauty - Smooth and Bumpy

UMA student, Renata Lemire from Alberta, Canada, shares her Montessori original Sensorial Project which she entitled: Nature's Beauty - Smooth and Bumpy.

Materials:

  1. Wooden Tray
  2. Willow Basket
  3. Transparent vinyl smooth/bumpy mat cut same size as floor mat. One side is left smooth the other size has dried, clear, white glue ‘bumps’ randomly placed on it
  4. Cotton floor mat 
  5. 5 objects found in nature that are bumpy in texture with a corresponding match of the same object that is smooth in texture. Each pair of objects should be approximately the same size to one another. i.e.:  

*Birch and maple tree bark (better if cross section of a small log from each tree is available, so you do not have to kill a tree to obtain it

*A bumpy and a smooth stone

*An open, mature and an immature, but brown spruce pinecone

*Smooth wild berry and a berry made of tiny smaller ‘bumps’ similar to a raspberry (non-poisonous, of course!

*A smooth and a bumpy branch 

 

 

 

1) VISUAL: match the "same to same"

2) TACTILE: separate by "smooth and bumpy"

 

A very beautiful and inviting original Sensorial project!

 

 

The very clever "Smooth and Bumpy Mat" (below)

Thursday
Mar242011

Sensorial - Mystery Pouches

UMA student Shana McCarty-Ebler of Colorado Springs, CO shares her creative original project for the Sensorial area of learning. What a hit with the children!

Mystery Pouches

Purpose: To stimulate the child’s sense of touch and to correlate the sense of touch to the sense of sight.

Materials

  1. Wooden tray
  2. Wooden bowl holding 10 different natural objects (non-toy) that match the objects that are hidden in the pouches
  3. 10 individual pouches made from muslin which have little windows on one side that stay closed with velcro and that each contain an object which matches one of the objects that are in the wooden bowl
  4. A rug 

Tips

  1. When first introducing this exercise, start with just five items. Later, change them out to the other set of five items. And then later, place them all on the tray.
  2. Because the pouches are a white material, and since they will be touched a lot, at the beginning of the exercise: point to the pouches, look down at your hands, say, “I need to wash my hands” or “I need clean hands” and then go wash them. 
  3. When demonstrating, pick up the pouches very ceremoniously (to indicate how to gently handle them)…in other words, discourage the possible temptation to pull the flap. 

Option: Although the pictures indicate the items aligned horizontally, another option is as follows, especially when beginning with only five objects:

  1. Take out each object, name them and place them in a vertical row on left side of rug
  2. Take out each pouch and place them in a vertical row on far right side of rug.
  3. Lift, feel, and name the top object in left row
  4. Starting with the top pouch in right row feel it carefully…continue down the row until you find the match
  5. Lay the match just to the right of the object
  6. Continue in same manner until all have been matched
  7. “Let’s check to be sure” (lift each flap, starting at the top)

What I learned from creating this original project: The sewing took longer than I had anticipated, but I really enjoyed doing this project.  I tried to think of similarly shaped objects that may make it a little more difficult to discern…The varying objects were of differing shapes and sizes, which added an element of interest as well.

What I learned from my demonstration of this activity: I had learned from my last lesson to remain completely quiet and to focus on the work rather than the child or try to read his face, so that went pretty well this time.  I was very happy that he did this work a couple more times on his own. It made me feel that it was successful.  The coin and the key kind of disappeared in the corner of the pouch and were a little difficult to maneuver into the window area and made me think about using a double-sided scotch tape the leave it centered, but not obscure the “feel” of the object.

What I learned from the child’s response:  His squeal of delight made my day.  I knew that he would enjoy doing this work and I left him completely alone…with his back to me, where I could discreetly see how it was going.  He was completely absorbed.

Very clever. Thank you Shana!

Thursday
Jan202011

A Colorful Sorting Exercise

Children love to sort things. Here is a basic, easy-to-make, inviting sorting activity. 

This activity will aid your child's development on many levels... can you name a few?

Wednesday
May272009

Original Project: Geography and Art

Recently John and Trudy participated in the Pacific NW Montessori Association’s Sharing Fair, held at the Seattle Islamic Montessori School. We are featuring one of many wonderful projects for you to enjoy. This project was shared by Robyn Atkins, who says, “This is a great project for Geography studies, a solar system unit, Earth Day, or anytime you are talking about Planet Earth!”

Materials required are:

FIMO clay...brown (for land), blue (for water), and white (for air)
Toothpicks or large tack to make a hole in the clay
Hemp string
Mini-muffin tin for baking

Earth Beads
Making the Beads
Wearing the Beads

Let us know at UMA if you would like more information on the project and the steps in presentation.

Enjoy!

Monday
May182009

Materials Presentation: Sequencing Exercises!

Here are four sets of sequencing exercises, submitted by UMA graduate, Darlene Mullen of Silverdale, Washington.


Thank you Darlene!

Friday
May152009

Sequencing and Matching Exercise, Pam Morgan

Pam Morgan of Elkin WV shares with us the beautiful, natural materials she used to make a sequencing and matching exercise, using cross sections of tree limbs. It was a joint project, in that her husband had made the tray by hand. Thank you, Pam, for inspiring us to utilize the beauty of creation, so that we might, in turn, inspire the children to appreciate and value their natural environment.


Monday
May042009

Sensorial Exercise, Material Composition Board


Here's another presentation from our archives presented by Tracy Charlesworth-John – Port Orford, OR

Material Composition Board

The idea for the "Materials Composition Blocks" was inspired by my daughter and her friend.

We were all sitting around the table, drinking and eating. My daughter's friend says, "I know what that is," (pointing to a glass), "That's glass.”

And my daughter replied, "That's plastic," (pointing to another cup). And her friend continued, "That's ceramic.”

So I held up a lid to a mason jar, and my daughter replies, "metal.” And we continued with the different materials that we see in our everyday settings. They were both really proud of their ability to identify and feel the varying textures and weights and seemed excited to express their knowledge!

The sensorial exercise is in the style of the "rough and smooth" boards and the "material match". There are 6 pairs of wooden blocks- each pair mounted with one of the following compositions: Metal, plastic, wood, cork, rubber, glass or ceramic. (Blocks are sorted into baskets, one of each pair (6 total) per basket.

Thank you Tracy!

Wednesday
Apr152009

Sensorial Exercise, Material Composition Board

It is great posting materials demonstrations from past blogs UMA has hosted. Here is one from Tracy Charlesworth-John of Port Orford, OR.

She writes:

"The idea for the "Materials Composition Blocks" was inspired by my daughter and her friend.

We were all sitting around the table, drinking and eating. My daughter's friend says, "I know what that is," (pointing to a glass), "That's glass.”
And my daughter replied, "That's plastic," (pointing to another cup). And her friend continued, "That's ceramic.”

So I held up a lid to a mason jar, and my daughter replies, "metal.” And we continued with the different materials that we see in our everyday settings. They were both really proud of their ability to identify and feel the varying textures and weights and seemed excited to express their knowledge!

The sensorial exercise is in the style of the "rough and smooth" boards and the "material match". There are 6 pairs of wooden blocks- each pair mounted with one of the following compositions: Metal, plastic, wood, cork, rubber, glass or ceramic. (Blocks are sorted into baskets, one of each pair (6 total) per basket."

Thanks again Tracy!